Thoughts on ‘Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes’

In the prelude of Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, Maria Konnikova tells how, when her father read her and her siblings “A Scandal in Bohemia,” she was inspired to count the steps in every staircase she encountered so that she could prove she’d “observed” and not just “seen.” That kind of thinking – the ability to call to mind any needed fact, the flash of insight into a person from a glance at their shoes and their fingertips – is the kind we associate with Sherlock Holmes. However, Konnikova argues that this isn’t the right way to go about the observational approach advocated by Holmes and uses the stories to illustrate her arguments. Continue reading

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Thoughts on ‘Brain on Fire’

If you’re asked to define yourself, coming up with a working answer might take a few minutes. But you would have some things spring to mind, whether it’s boy or girl, native of certain country, hobbyist in something near and dear. You’d have to weigh which aspects of yourself are “you” and which are the result of outside factors. The definition could be given quickly and glibly, or it could be given with thought and consideration. But either way, most people could give an answer. The concept of self comes as naturally to most of us as breathing.

Brain on Fire takes an unsparing look at what it’s like to have that selfhood ripped away. Continue reading

Thoughts on ‘Johannes Cabal The Necromancer’

Johannes Cabal traded his soul to Satan to gain power over the dead.

And as is usual in such deals, he eventually realizes that he wants it back. What is not standard is the method in which Satan decides to let him attempt to regain that soul.

To regain his soul, Johannes Cabal has to run a carnival. Continue reading